As Seen On The Web

In a stack of papers called Connections.

  • Apr
  • 26
  • 2008

For a variety of reasons, I found myself back on Dan Cederholm’s site SimpleBits. I used to visit that site all the time, but the frequency has dropped off in the last few years. Glancing at the home page, Dan includes several quotations from folks high up in the Web design world. Thing is, most of the quotations apply to teaching, too:

For Web

For Teaching

There’s a possibility that really great web design receives neither praise nor criticism. It just works. (source)

There’s a possibility that really great [teaching] receives neither praise nor criticism. It just works.

…this isn’t a field of straightforward answers and universal solutions. We are often faced with problems that have multiple solutions, none of them perfect. To understand what makes each solution imperfect and to know which of them is the best choice in the situation—that’s knowing your craft. (source)

…this isn’t a field of straightforward answers and universal solutions. We are often faced with problems that have multiple solutions, none of them perfect. To understand what makes each solution imperfect and to know which of them is the best choice in the situation—that’s knowing your craft. (no translation needed; brilliant)

Speaking of the purpose for a side venture, Dan writes,

a targeted destination for standards-aware designers and developers and the companies seeking to hire them. (source)

Maybe districts should be

a targeted destination for standards-aware [teachers] and [administrators] and the [schools] seeking to hire them. (standards aware, not necessarily standards devoted)

If people use your site enough, they’ll want an even faster way to reach the content they want. They’re not browsing anymore. They are power users. They know what they want. Give them a nicely hackable URL to do this. (source)

If [students] use your [lessons] enough, they’ll want an even faster way to reach the content they want. They’re not browsing anymore. They are power users. They know what they want. Give them a nicely hackable [skill] to do this.

These are people speaking about communicating a message. Maybe those who see more direct evidence of their communication are the ones to look to for lessons. Have you ever needed a more direct line of logic for paying attention to design and those who blog about it? For considering design elements when creating handouts and lessons?

I spent a few 12-hour days last week finishing off those essays I collected a month ago. Some interesting results came of it and I’ll share those with you in the next few days. Their writing overall was poor and I’m trying to give them hackable skills as a result. I’m not saying I always do it and I’m not even saying I do it successfully. “But I’m tryin’, Ringo. I’m tryin’ real hard to be a shepherd.”

1 comment

1. Ben says:

[4/29/2008 - 5:13 am]

Awesome, simply awesome. It lends itself nicely to the belief that teaching is really just effective communication and presentation, and that really good web design can actually help teach users on how to best get to the content they want.